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After you have updated your stylesheet, make sure you turn this module off

Ready or Not, 2019 is Almost Here!

It might be hard to believe, but 2018 is drawing to a close. Right now your company may be preparing for a slow-down during the holiday season, ramping up for your busiest time of year, or rolling along with business as usual. In any case, it’s time to start thinking about 2019. Our revised and updated checklist will keep you on track as you look ahead to the new year.

Does Employee Training Time Affect Payroll?

Hiring Minors? Follow These 5 Best Practices

In October 2015, 23.7% of US high school students age 16-19 had jobs. Where are these young people working? According to Bureau of Labor Statistics data, industries in accommodation and food services (e.g. restaurants, hotels), retail (including grocery and food stores) and arts, entertainment and recreation (including amusement parks) see the highest numbers of youth workers. These tend to be companies looking for entry-level, minimum wage and temporary workers, maybe even yours. 

FLSA 101 Update: A New Administration May Not Mean a New Rule

The Fair Labor Standard Act (FLSA) final rule on overtime was to take effect on December 1, 2016. Last fall, we explained the changes and gave some tips for compliance. Then in September, a lawsuit was filed to challenge the final rule. What’s happened since then? Let us bring you up to speed.

21 States Will Increase Minimum Wage in 2017

Although anticipated FLSA overtime rule changes have been put on hold, almost half of the United States will increase their state minimum wages in 2017. So, as an employer, what does that mean for you?

The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) establishes the federal minimum wage, which is currently $7.25/hour ($2.13 for tipped employees). However, FLSA also stipulates that state or local laws supersede FLSA rules if the state or local laws are more favorable to the employee. In other words, employers must pay the state minimum wage if the state minimum wage is greater than $7.25/hour. And, as previously mentioned, almost half the country will increase state/local minimum wage in 2017. The table below highlights the minimum wages you can expect in 2017.

Keeping up with Changing Compliance Requirements

There were a few important alerts announced this month that change federal compliance for human resource management that may affect your company. We thought it was worth going through the announcements one more time. 

FLSA 101 UPDATED: Surviving the New Overtime Rules

It's been a strange few months. As we told you in July, FLSA changes are on their way. But these changes seem to be, well, changing.  Here are the latest updates, on both the rule and various attempts to thwart it.

As of now, the rule changes outlined below are set to go into effect on December 1, 2016. This is despite the following.

So - what's an employer to do? The experts agree - prepare for the FLSA changes as if they are indeed going into effect December 1. 

FLSA 101: The Basics on Surviving the New Overtime Rules

 

You've probably heard a lot lately about the FLSA rule changes. I know we've blogged about it (along with many others). We've also heard that the rule changes are confusing. So - we're setting out to set the record straight, along with a few survival tips, so we're all ready on December 1st.

What It Is:

As we said, the Department of Labor (DOL) recently unveiled the newest addition to the Fair Labor Standards Act, a law that has been updated multiple times over the last several decades. With the new rule, the DOL raises the minimum salary threshold for overtime exempt workers within companies with over $500,000 in annual revenue. The two main types of salaries are:

  1. Exempt from overtime (these employees don't qualify for overtime)
  2. Non-exempt from overtime (these employees do qualify for overtime)

Although many employees believe they belong to the first group, salary exempt, a lot fall under the salary non-exempt category. This is usually because they do not fall under the true definition of a manager (see the What It Boils Down To section below).